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The Mysterious Origins of ‘HOOAH,’ The Army’s Beloved Battle Cry

October 11, 2017

From the Task and Purpose website

To a civilian, “hooah!” can sound like a completely nonsensical utterance, the guttural wail of an unhinged man on the verge of defeat. But to a soldier in the U.S. Army, however, it’s a fearsome a battle cry that heard on battlefields and among battalions deployed around the globe.

The meaning of the battle cry is difficult to describe: According to the Army’s Brief Guide to Modern Military Jargon, “hooah” can mean anything aside from no, and dropping the magic word “can do anything from getting a Soldier off the hook to earning him or her pushups,” the guide cautions. But while some Navy units have adopted “HOOYAH” soon and the Marine Corps now lays claim to “OOHRAH,” the characteristic road belong, always, to the Army.

But how did the primal roar become a mainstay of Army vernacular?

From → History

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