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Taps: Stanley H. L. Lum

May 18, 2021

Stanley Hampton Lanihuli Lum, Sr. was born on August 29, 1930 in Honolulu, Hawai’i to parents Martha Bolster and Hung Bung Lum. From the age of 2, Lanihuli, as his family called him, was raised by his grandparents, John and Elizabeth Bolster in Kalihi. As a child, Stanley, as he was known to friends, attended St. Anthony, Kapalama Elementary and Stevenson Intermediate Schools.

In 1943, he entered Kamehameha School for Boys. Stanley enjoyed his years there and formed lifelong friendships with his fellow Warriors while sneaking out of dorms to leave campus, fooling the school doctor into believing he was another student who was supposed to be sick at Hale Ola so the student could play in a football game all while making sure the doctor didn’t hear the radio broadcast of the game, and leading his classmates of The Great ’48 to Song Contest victory. Stanley went to the University of Hawai’i Manoa and graduated in 1952 with a degree in Business Administration.

Stanley met his future bride, Betty Kalikolehuaokalani Fernandez, when they both served as attendants for the wedding of his friend John Jones and her sister Winifred. Stanley was instantly smitten and he and Betty began dating in 1951. They married on November 8, 1952 at Sacred Hearts Church in Honolulu. They had five children. The family settled in Kane’ohe and enjoyed camping, spending time with their extended family, and traveling to the mainland. Stanley and Betty and their children were active members of St. Ann’s Catholic Church, attending weekly mass and joining in church events and fundraisers.

Stanley joined the United States Army in 1953 and retired in 1975 as a Major from the Hawai’i Air National Guard. As a civilian worker, Stanley worked for Hawaiian Airlines, the Territory of Hawai’i, State of Hawai’i, and the Federal Government with the Federal Aviation Administration. After retiring from the FAA, Stanley worked for the City and County of Honolulu as an appointee of then-mayor Eileen Anderson. Stanley then joined Queen Lili’uokalani Children’s Center before becoming the Deputy Administrator for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. Stanley retired from OHA in 1991. Stanley also served on the Board of Directors for Alu Like and Pu’a Foundation, organizations dedicated to improving the welfare of Native Hawaiians.

Above all else, Stanley was a devoted husband, father and grandfather. He and Betty raised their children to know and love the Lord. They impressed upon their children the importance of education and were very proud that all of their children went on to earn a college degree. They had six grandchildren whom they spoiled. They relished in being grandparents and loved taking their grandchildren to Kamehameha’s traveling preschool, going to T-ball games, and being invited to special school events. Stanley cared for Betty as her health declined until her passing in 2000. In the time they had together, they created a lei of love.

A few years after Betty’s passing, Stanley reconnected with Aletha Ka’ohi, a fellow member of the Great ’48. Their friendship grew into a relationship that gave both Stanley and Aletha joy after the loss of a great love. Always a great communicator, he loved music, he loved to read and he loved to write. Together with Aletha and two friends, Stanley compiled and edited, Celebrating Advocacy: Past, Present & Future for the State Council of Hawaiian Congregational Churches, a book published in 2008.

Stanley loved connecting with people. He would find something in common with everyone he met. He loved his family and friends. He was the one they turned to for advice and wisdom, which was always balanced with kindness and aloha and shared so freely. Stanley was blessed with good health and a sharp mind for more than 90 years. He fell ill towards the end of 2020 and though he was frustrated by the physical limitations imposed upon his body, he willed himself to do as much as he could.

Stanley peacefully took his last breath on April 29, 2020 at his home in Kane?ohe, surrounded by his loving family. He now rejoices with the Lord, reunited with his wife Betty and other loved ones who have gone before him. Stanley is survived by his five children: daughter Oriette Afosea (Rudy) Vegas; son Stanley Hampton Lanihuli (Ella) Lum, Jr.; daughters: Elizabeth-Arlis Kahokuokalani (Blaise) Liu, Lila Lilinoe Lum, Kimberly Kalikolehuaokalani (Cats) Magbual; six grandchildren: Shaunda (Puni) Makaimoku, Tiffany Vegas, Megan (Jeivin) DeCosta-Mararagan, Kerilyn Liu, Devin (Mary Grace) Lum, Brianna Magbual; six great-grandchildren, Briseis Benskin, twins, Reese and Ryleigh, and Spencer Makaimoku, and twins, Gavin and Grayson Lum; companion Aletha Ka’ohi; sisters Beverly Garcia, Kay Phillips, Noelene Low, Sharon (Ralph) Apo, Alberta Lono, Luana Kin Choy, and Lehua Lum; brother Kalehua Stanton; sisters-in-law Winifred Jones and Christine Fernandez; and numerous nieces and nephews.

We will celebrate Stanley’s life on Thursday, May 20, 2021 with a mass at St. Ann’s Church in Kane’ohe at 9:00 a.m. and burial at Hawaiian Memorial Park Cemetery at 2:00 p.m. The mass and burial will be open to the public. 200 people maximum allowed to attend mass; no capacity limitation at burial. Masks and social distancing required at both events.

From → History

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