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What to know about shingles and chickenpox

October 13, 2021

From the Medical News Today website

Shingles is a viral infection resulting from the same virus that causes chickenpox. After recovering from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant in a person’s body. It can then reactivate later, causing shingles. It is not possible for a person to get shingles if they have never had chickenpox.

Shingles is a viral infection resulting from the same virus that causes chickenpox. After recovering from chickenpox, the virus stays dormant in a person’s body. It can then reactivate later, causing shingles. It is not possible for a person to get shingles if they have never had chickenpox.

Chickenpox is a highly contagious virus that infected more than 4 million people every year nationally before the release of the chickenpox vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) now report 92% fewer cases of chickenpox due to the development of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV) vaccine.

After recovery, the virus can hibernate in the body’s nerve cells, where it may remain dormant for years because the body cannot remove it without damaging the nerves. When the virus reactivates, instead of a chickenpox infection, it may cause a shingles outbreak.

In this article, we discuss the relationship between shingles, chickenpox, and the VZV vaccine. We also explore ways to avoid virus transmission.

From → Health & Safety

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